Easter Egg
Hunt
Scrap
Book
Summer
Camp
Eventing Choose
an Event
Dressage Camping
with Horses
Parade Horse Bowl
Quiz
Driving Christmas
Pagent
t
Drill Team

Training

Fox
Hunting
Reading &
Lecture
Educational
Trips
Competitive
Trail Riding

Holloween
Trick or Treat

Theraputic
riding
Toddler Pony
School
     

Vaulting
Can be described as gymnastics with the incorporation of acrobatic and ballet elements on horseback. Children perform compulsory exercises as well as self-designed programs. They can work alone, in pairs or in triples.The activity builds confidence, balance, flexibility and self-control.
Scrap Book

When children enter the program they are requested to keep a scrapbook. This includes a portrait of their "Dream horse" and listing of all it's attendant needs including tack, grooming tools, stabling, shots, shoes, lessons and horse related event records such as entry/transportation fees for shows, gymkhanas, fox hunts, hunter trials, clinics, competitive trail rides etc.. This gives a vibrant appreciation of the costs of the sport. Scrapbook includes an ongoing record of child's lessons, appearances and events, attainments of mounted and unmounted tests, health record of her pony (when shod or trimmed, worming dosage, inoculations, feeding schedule and tack used). Poems, essays and drawings are encouraged.

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Summer Camp

Children may attend Summer Camp with the choice of 2 week sessions up to 8 weeks. On weekdays Camp begins at 9am with a lesson until 12pm. Children bring their own lunch during which they are lectured on a specific faze of horse mastership. The afternoon session could be games, a mock horse show, a trail ride, vaulting, driving or a swim in a nearby pool or lake. On the last day of camp there is a three phase rally where ribbons and awards are presented. Camp runs from the last week of June till second week of August.

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Eventing

Three-phase events are held over one, two or three days. They are divided into: Pre-novice, Novice, Training, Preliminary, Intermediate and Open. They are: Dressage, Cross-country ( over a course of varied terrain with 10 or more jumps of suitable heights) and Show jumping. Club events are called the Rallies and add written test and Horse Management Fazes.

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Choose an Event

Once a year children have a choice of a Treasure Hunt, Popcorn Chase or Mock Hunt. For the Treasure Hunt clues are given in a poem. Children have to decode consecutive clues to find the “bag of gold" (chocolate candy) at the end of the hunt. Popcorn Chase riders go out following a laid trail of popcorn which leads to a certain designated house where popcorn and soda will be found. Mock Hunt: riders are chosen to enact the duties of the officials of the fox hunt and their hounds. The traditions and events of the hunt are recreated in order to educate the students to their decorum and behavior when participating in a "real" fox hunt. This is followed by a lavish potluck hunt breakfast.

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Dressage

     Training is a translation of the French word Dressage. Horses and riders exhibit their stage of training by performing a compulsory set of movements within the dressage arena. The levels of training accede to the Grand Prix Level which is performed at the Olympics and other International Competitions. Comparatively inexperienced horses and riders can compete at the walk-trot level in local shows and rallies. Prix Caprilli dressage tests include jumps at different gaits interspersed with the movements. Pas De Deux is two riders exhibiting their horse’s skills in the same arena. A Quadrille consists of four to eight riders performing simultaneously. A Kur is an original musical ride usually done with a team and sometimes costumed. At Manitou Farm dressage is taught as a left brain\right brain activity, where riders learn perieophysical positioning while concentrating on the horses performance and their own posture and use of aids.

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Camp with Horses

On Memorial Day members of the club may participate in a four day camp-out at Sharpe Reservation. The trip includes: a day trail ride from the farm to the Reservation, children and parents stay in the cabins overnight after they have fed, watered and bedded down the horses (horses are let out in a grassy pasture with volunteer adults taking turns keeping night watch). In the morning after breakfast there is a formal lesson with jumping. After lunch there is horse- swimming practice followed by races around pylons in the water. Parents have an opportunity to participate in a moonlight ride after dinner. Before leaving on Monday there are horseback games and an Awards luncheon. Parents have a responsibility to provide meals on a rotating basis or organize potluck dinners.This is an annual event which children never forget. The first question witch visiting alumni always ask is: "Do we still go to Sharpe?"

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Parade

The Club has traditionally marched in the Peekskill 4th of July Parade and in The Founders Day Parade in Cold Spring. We are sometimes invited to perform our drill team show, and give pony rides.

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Horse Bowl Quiz
 

Children not only learn and demonstrate their riding skills at Manitou Farm, they also must be familiar with terms used in horsemanship, the normal care and nursing care of horses and the history and lore surrounding the animals. To this end compulsory reading assignments and periodic oral and written testing are parts of the program.

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Driving
 

Leona’s pupils can learn driving from the ground, in sulkies (little pony wagon), in bobsleds and from skis (skijoring). Driving is used as a training devise for young horses as well as means to develop “soft hands” in the rider.

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Chrismas Pagent

A Garrison tradition at the Saunder’s Farm is the annual Christmas Pageant. This includes dancing townspeople, the Holy Couple, the inn keeper who directs the entourage to the stable, shepherds coming from the fields, angels on high, barnyard animals, lighting of the star on the roof, the three kings with their servants, all enthusiastically observed and accompanied by music and carols from the audience. Directed by Reverend Frank Geer of Saint Philip’s Episcopal Church,Garrison. After the singing the spectators are invited to pet the animals held by the angels and graciously loaned by the Barnyard Critters 4H Club and Mahopac Farm. A potluck feast ensues at Saint Phillip’s Parish House. It is a true community affair since the Garrison Horse and Pony Club, the 4H, the Scouts, the Saunder’s Farm owners and the congregation all participate in staging the event.

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Drill Team
 

The Red Horse Troop Drill Team is composed of eight matched chestnut horses and three ponies as color guard. Horses are dressed in blue and white saddle pads, white rope necklaces and white leg bandages. The riders wear blue helmet covers, white turtlenecks with blue sashes over their britches and boots. They carry white lances with blue flags. The three pony riders carry a red, white or blue flag. The leader on a Morgan stallion carries the American Flag. The riders perform military formations. Unique to this team is the inclusion of jumping formations over cavaletti.

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Training

Manitou Farm has its own breeding program and foals are born almost every year, providing a steady stream of young stock in need of training. From the beginning children bond with the foals, gentling, haltering and leading them next to their dams. Then they learn how to be led independently, halt, back, bend rows of barrels, do figure eights and other ring figures on the ground. Carrots and praise contribute largely to the education of the foal. The children help to teach the youngsters to lunge, carry tack, walk over and under obstacles and ground drive. They eventually learn to stand while being mounted. Since these fledglings have accompanied the herd on trail rides from the start it is an easy step to be ridden with the group. Formal training including advanced movements and jumping is carried on by the upper level riders.

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Fox Hunt

Qualified riders can be invited to attend the Millbrook, Rombout or Jockey Hollow Hunts. There are three divisions of riders: hill toping, second flight and first flight in the field, depending on the rider’s experience and the horse’s training. Hill toping is for less experienced riders who are guided by a member of the hunt to positions which allow the observation of the hounds and the hunt servants’ work. Second flight is riding at the back of the field under the supervision of the field master, who will direct horses around difficult fences. First flight is riding with full-fledged members of the hunt. Riders learn the workings of the hounds, the uses of the horn, wiles of the fox and all the duties and functions of the hunt. Parents and non riders accompany the hunt by car hoping for a view of the spectacle from the road (the Car Brigade).

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Reading & Lecture

Lecture programs are continued throughout the year but are more intense during non riding months. Reading about horses and horsemanship is required for all children in order to pass annual riding and knowledge tests. There is an extensive book and video library available. Children make posters, sculptures, design board and card games for the edification and entertainment of their fellow students.

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Educational trips
 

Members of Manitou Farm and Leona’s pupils have participated in trips to: Saratoga Springs Racing Museum, Trotting Horse Hall of Fame, Breakfast at Belmont, etc

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Competitive trail riding
 

Riders learn to condition their horses and themselves for grueling 25 to 40 mile timed distance riding over varied terrain under the surveillance (at various check points) of veterinarians. These events are divided into junior, senior, breed or team classifications.

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Halloween
  Children design and construct costumes for themselves and their horses, then take a Trick-a- Treat ride through the neighborhood for carrots and apples. After the ride there is a doughnut and cider party at the farm.
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Easter Egg Hunt
 

Decorated eggs are placed around the field. On the reverse are questions ranging in dificulty from 5 to 15 points. Team of a rider and a helper find eggs. If they can answer the question they may keep the egg. After all eggs are collected prizes are awarded to the highest point team. Jelly beans, hard boiled eggs & soda are served.

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Theraputic riding
 

The LRH Foundation is a non profit organization operated by the parents to provide physical and occupational education as well as recreation to handicapped individuals. Emotional, physical and intellectual delays are addressed in this programs. Volunteers are trained to assist the riders. Horses are chosen for their patience and tolerance. Emphasis is placed on games where social interaction is required. Adaptive equipment is used for needful individuals. Sessions are held for group homes (adults) as well as children with special needs. Suppling and cognitive exercises are routine. Students from regular lessons and parents have a chance to volunteer for the preparation of the equipment, leading the horses, side walking those who need and acting as one-on-one instructors directed by the teacher. Since 1980 demonstrations of rider's abilities, special adaptive equipment and games played have been held at the Peekskill Rotary Horse show. In the last two years the show had provided an entire division for the handicapped riders invited from the local area. Classes include horsemanship, suitability of mount and timed games with honorable mention of volunteers. Classes are divided according to ability, i.e., riders with leader and one or two side walkers, riders with only a leader and independent riders, receiving individual championships and reserve championships. The Foundation is presently in the process of organizing a special division at the Putnam County 4H Horse Show and a fundraising horse show at the Yorktown Grange Fair. In keeping with the proposition that the volunteer workers with horses and the handicap deliver as much benefit to themselves as to their charges, the Foundation has always solicited help from other atrisk organizations Graymoor's New Hope Farm, The Walter Hoving Home, Aunt Bessie's Open Door who collaborated with the Foundation on the fundraising Horse Show at which representative Richard Ottinger presided, and presently the Peekskill Youth Bureau. Local high schools offer volunteers in this program to satisfy civic service requirements.

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Toddler Pony School

The program is designed to introduce children age two to five to ponies. The children attending must have avid interest and attentive level to sustain the activities which include exercises such us "tricks", lead line, lunge line and games. This is a one on one learning process. Parents are required to assist in all the activities. The classes are held weekdays late afternoon spring and fall. For more information and availability call 845 737 75 56.

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Manitou Farm / located in historic Garrison NY South Mountain Pass / across from 123 Deli / 845 737 75 56 /



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